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Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:38 am
by gavinmac
shizzle wrote: But if he's wanted for stealing a car, who gives a shit?



He's not wanted for stealing a car. He's wanted for theft, but I'm pretty sure it's wasn't a car. Have you ever seen guys who get arrested for stealing cars? They are generally tough, hardened fuckers or grease monkey types who are good with cars.

Wilcox is an allegedly gay, real or fake psychologist who posts a lot on facebook about relationships and loving people. He's not tough or manly enough to steal a car or mug someone or break into someone's house. His "theft" had to be a white collar crime of some sort, like stealing his gay lover's checkbook and going on a shopping spree at the Fort Lauderdale Bloomingdale's. Or maybe he sweet talked an old lady out of her life savings. But he didn't steal a car.

What did the Cambodia Daily say about him? Did they credit this website? Don't journalistic ethics require that now when reporters get info from websites?

And where is Dr. Ken now? Unavailable for comment?

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:43 am
by flying chicken
shizzle wrote:
Of all the dirty, fucked up, pieces of shit lowlife western con men that come to Cambodia, this guy doesn't seem all that bad. If he was a paedophile, a kidnapper, a terrorist, a murderer or a rapist, then fuck him, he deserves to have his balls in a sling. But if he's wanted for stealing a car, who gives a shit?



Yea, many real culprits rarely come under the spotlight. They can be categorise into 3 types: the idiots, the powerful, and the money as leverage. The idiots are easy target partly because they don't know how to play the game. The latter 2 is a daunting one. I'll share the last one. Koreans are notorious on buying underage sex, more so after the 2003 crack down on brothels in Korea. Why you don't hear about them in the Cambodia medias? Because they are connected and can always use $ to buy their way out. Try living in SR for couple of months and observe.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:51 am
by jimbob
Jack Pot wrote:Isn't "grand theft" (aside from Hanky's video) one of those ones where you fiddled your taxes or something, it's not the theft that's grand but who you stole from.


I think the definition might vary from state to state.

I recall that it is based on the amount of money or value of items stolen and know of one person being charged with grand theft for allegedly stealing over $500.00 in cash, which is not very much really.

No idea about this case but there has been huge number of incidents of consumer credit card and mortgage frauds coming to light in the past few years in America.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:07 am
by MissTara
How do you stop it? Will it have to been other country's authorities stepping in? I know they have been doing a pretty thorough job investigating and cracking down on Siem Reap organisations.

Its also pretty easy for the situation to seem a whole lot worse than it really is due to clever wording. I know for a fact my project was investigated and still under close watch because it would be easy to assume we are another one of the NGO's to pop up overnight, appeal for funds, and take random pictures of kids with bikes borrowed from down the street and live a comfortable existence on the funds we scam. In fact, its the organisation KidsCare that is the NGO, what we started was raising awareness of the situation in Cambodia in USA and Australia. It actually costs me money!!

Anyway, I'd like to know the full Ken story and I have his mobile number, so if he's still around for our appointment, I'll catch up on the goss.

I'm really interested as to how westerners treat known paedophiles or major criminal activities - ie if you knew it was going on, would you report and and who to? Or would you think it too risky to do so?

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:15 am
by flying chicken
MissTara wrote:
I'm really interested as to how westerners treat known paedophiles or major criminal activities - ie if you knew it was going on, would you report and and who to? Or would you think it too risky to do so?


I wish there's a simple answer to this. I personally witnessed a couple during my time. 2 were happening right in front of my very eyes, the idiot types. There are 2 ways I can think of that you can go out it. 1) Cut a deal with the cops if culprit is a foreigner. 2) take the matter into your own hand.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:26 am
by shizzle
GM, you could be right about the shopping spree at Bloomingdale's. According to the Boward County Clerk's office, he is wanted for "grand theft in the 3rd degree". There seem to be some conflicting reports as to what this means, but the general consensus is that it is defined as:
    * Worth $300 or more but less than $5,000.
    * Worth $100 or more but less than $300, taken from unenclosed curtilage of dwelling.
    * A motor vehicle.
    * A fire extinguisher.
    * A stop sign.
    * A will or another form of testament.
    * 2,000 or more pieces of citrus fruit.
    * Anhydrous ammonia.
    * A firearm.
    * A commercial farm animal.
Image

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:37 am
by gavinmac
Keep in mind that Wilcox also has charges against him for being a really bad drunk driver, running a light, leaving his lane, trying to outrun the police, etc. Shizzle can post the image of those details, I can't work the computer that well. He actually skipped bail on the DUI/fleeing the police charge as well as the grand theft charge.

Let me tell you how Wilcox is going to spin this stuff to his flock of supporters in Cambodi. He's going to say that he made a mistake, he drove drunk once, he was going through personal stress at the time, he got treatment.

He will say he never intended to steal from anyone. The theft charge was just a misunderstanding from a domestic incident where he borrowed or mistakenly took something from someone and they called the police. That's how people always explain away theft charges on their records. They never admit "I was a thief."

As for the outstanding warrants, Wilcox will claim that he hired a lawyer to handle the criminal charges and the lawyer told him it had all been "taken care of," and that he had no idea that there were warrants for his arrest, so the lawyer must have misled him, and he's really a victim in all this. That's how people always explain outstanding warrants. They never admit "I didn't want to face the music so I jumped bail."

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:41 am
by andyinasia
MissTara wrote:I'm really interested as to how westerners treat known paedophiles or major criminal activities - ie if you knew it was going on, would you report and and who to? Or would you think it too risky to do so?


How the K440 community deal with this issue is all explained in this thread:

http://88.80.20.44/chat_forum/viewtopic.php?t=14985

Put the perp's name into the K440 search engine for the backstory.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:42 am
by fopro
Jack Pot wrote:Isn't "grand theft" (aside from Hanky's video) one of those ones where you fiddled your taxes or something, it's not the theft that's grand but who you stole from.

Grand theft is, generally speaking, simple theft of money or property over a certain dollar value or a specific type of property, depending on which state jurisdiction you happen to be in. E.g. in FL third degree grand theft is the theft of anything over $300. First degree, anything over $20,000. No telling from the charge against what happened. He could be a master jewel thief or some guy involved in a domestic dispute who took his wife's car without permission. To read between the lines of the complaint, it appears the cops are more upset that he ran than with the theft charge. Fleeing and eluding is the kind of thing you get charged with when you outrun the cops. Perhaps there's a good story behind what he did in the states, or maybe he's been involved in some as yet unmentioned nefarious activities in Cambodia. Even if he's just been practicing without proper credentials, that's worthy of attention and action. But if he's just a bullshitting foreigner with legal problems back home, well, this is after all Cambodia. At this point I don't understand why somebody would rat on this guy. Seems rather Dudly Doright to me. But then again, maybe there's something more to the story.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:44 am
by Banker
He came to buy a car from me about last May with his "Son" who I realized was in fact his B/F. He didnt buy the car but I found him a pleasant person to talk to, perhaps just a good con man.

Cheers Banker

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:45 am
by shizzle
gavinmac wrote:Keep in mind that he also has charges against him for being a really bad drunk driver, running a light, leaving his lane, trying to outrun the police, etc. Shizzle can post the image of those details, I can't work the computer that well. He actually skipped bail on the DUI/fleeing the police charge as well as the grand theft charge.


Image

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:52 am
by violet
Banker wrote:He came to buy a car from me about last May with his "Son" who I realized was in fact his B/F. He didnt buy the car but I found him a pleasant person to talk to, perhaps just a good con man.

Cheers Banker


are you 100% sure about that? He does have a "son" who is definitely not his boyfriend ...

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:01 am
by uglyfemnist
Did he go by the name of Ken when he was teaching, or another name?I'm pretty sure I've seen this guy somewhere before...did he have an alias?

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:30 am
by violet
he teaches a critical thinking evening class at New World Institute.

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:38 am
by Buscador
shizzle wrote:There seem to be some conflicting reports as to what this means, but the general consensus is that it is defined as:

* A commercial farm animal.

Could it be? heheheh

Seriously, however, it is extremely unlikely Flordia would be willing to pay international extradition costs--which are not cheap, by any means--for theft of under $500 and fleeing arrest. There has to be more to it than that. I suspect he either seriously angered someone in power, has information they need on a more serious case, or has additional charges waiting for him.